gallery/minisega

Work in progress - site still under maintenance - some areas may not be accessible.

 

Mini Sega is a miniature mechanical fruit machine, predominantly from the 1960's, designed from an earlier model made by Mills, called the Vest Pocket, from the late 1930's. The mechanics are housed in an 8" cube, with payout and reel flaps to hide it's true identity. Inspiration for the design came from the strict US gambling laws of the early 20th century.

After purchasing a mini Sega, I was surprised by the lack of information available. Information for the Mills Vest Pocket seemed readily available. This proved adequate enough to gather an understanding of how these machines worked, but little help when it came to maintenance, calibration and fault finding.

The aim of this site is to provide a resource for all Mini Sega owners who wish to maintain their machines, although this resource can extend to the original Mill's Vest Pocket too.

If you've recently acquired a Mini Sega, it's tempting to just grab some coins and play it, but it's not recommended. Many of these machines are likely to be at least sixty years old, and unless you know its owner and servicing history, it's best to at least check it over before playing it.

That's not to say Mini Segas are easy to break, but as with most clockwork operations, they require servicing. One of the signs of poor servicing is dried toffee-like oil stains covering most of the internal componants. Another sign is oil satuated reel strips, caused by over oiling of the reel shaft. If there is too much oil on the reel shaft, the centrifugal force as the reels spin will cause the oil to end up on the reel strips.

Stripping, rebuilding and calibrating the Mini Sega may seem daunting, but it's relatively easy and I'd highly recommend it to prolong the life of your machine.

In this website, I'll not only take you through the different aspects of what make up a Mini Sega, but give a photo reference guide on how to strip and rebuild a Mini Sega, as well as maintenance, calibration, and dealing with common problems.

Welcome to Mini Sega

July 1st, 2020 - Added diagrams page